Radio Address: Sen. Dill speaks to true meaning of Independence Day

Posted: July 01, 2016 | Senator Dill, Weekly Radio Address
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July Fourth, 2016, marks 240 years since the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. The events that followed would win America’s’ sovereignty, and change the world forever.

Hi, this is Senator Jim Dill from Old Town. Thanks for tuning in.

When we think about the Declaration of Independence, we often think of its role in the foundation of our country. We imagine it as the seed that grew into our unique form of government, with its three equal branches that act as checks and balances against each other.

Obviously, the Founders cared deeply about creating a just system of government, responsible to the people and accountable to them. They defiantly stated that government derives its authority not by divine mandate, inheritance or brute strength, but from the “consent of the governed.”

As citizens, we give that consent to our elected officials at the ballot box. We participate in the greatest democratic experiment every time we engage in our civic process.

But the Founders were also concerned about something deeper, and more immediate to our everyday lives. They believed that all people are created equal and with unalienable rights.

We enjoy those rights every day, even when we don’t realize it. Hardworking Maine moms and dads go the extra mile to provide for their families, ensuring the livelihoods of future generations. Young people grind and strive in school and in the workplace to meet their goals, to achieve more than anyone thought was possible. Seniors bristle at the thought of idle retirement, and stay involved in their communities, through volunteering and public service.

Every day, those Mainers, like all their fellow Americans, exercise their rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. In doing so, they live up to the promise of a better society set forth by our Founders.

That’s the legacy of the Declaration of Independence. It’s what we celebrate with parades and fireworks every Fourth of July. We celebrate the equality and freedoms that bind us together as Americans, regardless of our family histories or political affiliations.

It’s a legacy we can all be proud of.

I’m Senator Jim Dill. Thanks for listening, and have a happy and safe Fourth of July.

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